News & Outreach




Harvest Festival at Bloody Point Lighthouse, Pig & Oyster Roast

Harvest Festival at Bloody Point Lighthouse, Pig & Oyster Roast

Fall was in the Lowcountry air on October 1st, 2016 as the 1st Annual Harvest Festival kicked off! Folks gathered at The Bloody Point Lighthouse on Daufuskie Island as they enjoyed a roll-up-your-sleeves good time with a Pig and Oyster Roast, historical presentations, games for kids, and gift certificate giveaways! Admission was FREE to the event; however, there was a small charge for food which included all-you-can-eat pork, oysters, sides, and non-alcoholic drinks. 
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Cash Crops for SC, Rice and Indigo

Cash Crops for SC, Rice and Indigo

While Virginia and North Carolina thrived on tobacco, it didn’t grow as well in South Carolina due to the more tropical climate and wetter ground, particularly in the lowlands of the state–or the southern portion. Rice, however, grew very well in South Carolina because the ground stayed wet. However, rice fields brought other problems, most notably mosquitoes.  
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Southern Live Oak Trees

Southern Live Oak Trees

Southern live oaks are majestic trees that are emblems of the South. When given enough room to grow, their sweeping limbs plunge toward the ground before shooting upward, creating an impressive array of branches. Crowns of the largest southern live oaks reach diameters of 150 feet—nearly large enough to encompass half of a football field! On average, though, the crown spread is 80 feet and the height is 50 feet.  
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What in the World is a Scuppernong?

What in the World is a Scuppernong?

Think of the scuppernong as the South’s super grape. The good news is that these resilient grapes are as tasty as they are good for you! It outlasts scorching temperatures that would shrivel the pinot, chardonnay, or gamay (and provides forty times more antioxidants). Its unusually thick skin keeps the bugs at bay. And it makes a robust jelly or wine, perfect accompaniments to duck, pork, or even fried green tomatoes.  
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